Welcome to Tola's Blog

One-Stop News, Entertainment, music, videos,Lifestyle, Fashion, Beauty, Inspiration and Gossip Blog

Saturday, 18 November 2017

TOP FIVE FILM FESTIVALS IN THE WORLD BY "AKOR JANET"


Top Five Film Festivals in the world
By Akor Janet

Fledgling filmmakers practice their craft far from the glitter of Hollywood. In backyards, in small studios or on local sets they transform their vision into a film that they hope will one day be seen by thousands or even millions of people around the world. What they may lack in budget and star power, they more than make up for in raw ambition.
Independent filmmakers might remain forever in obscurity were it not for film festivals. These annual events, where films are screened and professionally judged, are held around the world. At film festivals, cinema fans can see the new and sometimes daring films they would never be able to find in their local movie theaters.
Film festivals give new talent an opportunity to shine, while also showcasing the work of already well-known and respected filmmakers. Festivals can range from huge, star-studded events, such as the Cannes festival in France or the Sundance Film Festival in the United States, to small, independent, local awards that garner just a few hundred attendees. But all festivals have something in common: They celebrate the art of film and they champion the artists who produce it.
Film festival, gathering, usually annual, for the purpose of evaluating new or outstanding motion pictures, sponsored by national or local government, industry, service organization, experimental film groups, or individual promoters, the festival provide an opportunity for film makers, distributors, critics and other interested persons to attend film showings and meet to discuss current artistic development in films. At the festivals, distributors can purchase films that they think can be marketed successfully in their own countries
In this article, we'll visit five of the world’s biggest, quirkiest film festivals and their basic features;


CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
The Cannes Festival, named until 2002 as the International Film Festival (Festival international du film) and known in English as the Cannes Film Festival, is an annual film festival held in Cannes, France. The festival previews new films of all genres, including documentaries, from around the world. Founded in 1946, the invitation-only festival is held annually (usually in May) at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès.
The festival has become an important showcase for European films. Jill Forbes and Sarah Street argue in European Cinema: An Introduction that Cannes “became…extremely important for critical and commercial interests and for European attempts to sell films on the basis of their artistic quality.”
Forbes and Street also point out that, along with other festivals such as the Venice Film Festival and Berlin International Film Festival, Cannes offers an opportunity to determine a particular country’s image of its cinema and generally foster the notion that European cinema is “art” cinema.
Additionally, given massive media exposure, the non-public festival is attended by many movie stars and is a popular venue for film producers to launch their new films and attempt to sell their works to the distributors who come from all over the globe.


SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL
The Sundance Film Festival, a program of the Sundance Institute, is an American film festival that takes place annually in Utah. With 46,732 attendees in 2012, it is the largest independent film festival in the United States.
Held in January in Park City, Salt Lake City, and Ogden, as well as at the Sundance Resort, the festival is a showcase for new work from American and international independent filmmakers.
The festival comprises competitive sections for American and international dramatic and documentary films, both feature-length films and short films, and a group of out-of-competition sections, including NEXT, New Frontier, Spotlight, and Park City At Midnight. The 2016 Sundance Film Festival took place from January 21 to January 31, 2016.
The festival has changed over the decades from a low-profile venue for small-budget, independent creators from outside the Hollywood system to a media extravaganza for Hollywood celebrity actors, paparazzi, and luxury lounges set up by companies not affiliated with Sundance.
Festival organizers have tried curbing these activities in recent years, beginning in 2007 with their ongoing Focus On Film campaign.
The 2009 film Official Rejection documented the experience of small filmmakers trying to get into various festivals in the late 2000s, including Sundance. The film contained several arguments that Sundance had become dominated by large studios and sponsoring corporations.
A contrast was made between the 1990s, in which non-famous filmmakers with tiny budget films could get distribution deals from studios like Miramax Films or New Line Cinema, (like Kevin Smith’s Clerks), and the 2000s, when major stars with multimillion-dollar films (like The Butterfly Effect with Ashton Kutcher) dominated the festival. Kevin Smith doubted that Clerks, if made in the late 2000s, would be accepted to Sundance.


BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL
The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the world’s leading film festivals and most reputable media events. It is held annually in Berlin, Germany.
Founded in West Berlin in 1951, the festival has been celebrated annually in February since 1978. With around 300,000 tickets sold and 500,000 admissions it is considered the largest publicly attended film festival worldwide based on actual attendance rates.
Up to 400 films are shown in several sections, representing a comprehensive array of the cinematic world. Around twenty films compete for the awards called the Golden and Silver Bears. Since 2001 the director of the festival has been Dieter Kosslick.
The European Film Market (EFM), a film trade fair held simultaneously to the Berlinale, is a major industry meeting for the international film circuit. The trade fair serves distributors, film buyers, producers, financiers and co-production agents.
The Berlinale Talent Campus, a week-long series of lectures and workshops, gathers young filmmakers from around the globe. It partners with the festival itself and is considered to be a forum for upcoming artists.
The festival, the EFM and other satellite events are attended by around 20,000 professionals from over 130 countries. More than 4200 journalists are responsible for the media exposure in over 110 countries.
At high-profile feature film premieres, movie stars and celebrities are present at the red carpet. The Berlinale has established a cosmopolitan character integrating art, glamour, commerce and a global media attention.
When Does It Usually Take Place: February.
Founded: 1951.


VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
The Venice Film Festival or Venice International Film Festival founded in 1932, is the oldest film festival in the world and one of the “Big Three” film festivals alongside the Cannes Film Festival and Berlin International Film Festival.
The film festival is part of the Venice Biennale, which was founded by the Venetian City Council in 1895.
Today, the Biennale includes a range of separate events including: the International Art Exhibition; the International Festival of Contemporary Music; the International Theatre Festival; the International Architecture Exhibition; the International Festival of Contemporary Dance; the International Kids’ Carnival; and the annual Venice Film Festival, which is arguably the best-known of all the events.
The film festival has since taken place in late August or early September on the island of the Lido, Venice, Italy. Screenings take place in the historic Palazzo del Cinema on the Lungomare Marconi and in other venues nearby.
Since its inception the Venice Film Festival has grown into one of the most prestigious film festivals in the world.
When Does It Usually Take Place: Late August / Early September.
Founded: 1932


TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL
The Toronto International Film Festival is one of the largest publicly attended film festivals in the world, attracting over 480,000 people annually.
Over the last 40 years, TIFF has grown to become a year-round destination for film culture operating out of the TIFF Bell Lightbox, a dynamic centre for film culture that offers film lovers a world-class cinema experience including new releases, live one-of-a-kind film events and an interactive gallery.
Year-round, TIFF Bell Lightbox offers screenings, lectures, discussions, festivals, workshops, industry support and the chance to meet filmmakers from Canada and around the world. TIFF Bell Lightbox is located on the north west corner of King Street and John Street in downtown Toronto.
In 2015, 397 films from 71 countries were screened at 28 screens in downtown Toronto venues, welcoming an estimated 480,000 attendees, over 5,000 of whom were industry professionals.[2] TIFF starts the Thursday night after Labour Day (the first Monday in September in Canada) and lasts for eleven days.
Founded in 1976, TIFF is now one of the most prestigious events of its kind in the world. In 1998, Variety magazine acknowledged that TIFF “is second only to Cannes in terms of high-profile pics, stars and market activity.”
In 2007, TIME noted that TIFF had “grown from its place as the most influential fall film festival to the most influential film festival, period.” This is partially the result of TIFF’s ability and reputation for generating “Oscar buzz”.
The Toronto International Festival’s Grolsch People’s Choice Award — which is based on popular vote by Festival filmgoers — has emerged as a beacon of awards season success.
Past recipients of this audience accolade include Room, The Imitation Game, 12 Years a Slave, The King’s Speech, Slumdog Millionaire, Silver Linings Playbook, Argo,and Dallas Buyers Club.
When Does It Usually Take Place: September.
Founded: 1976.

Curled from Filmlistyle.com

No comments:

Post a Comment